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The Best Book Subgenre's

  1. Bizarro fiction: A genre that focuses on surreal and absurd storylines, often with elements of satire, horror, and fantasy.

  2. New Weird: A literary movement that blends elements of speculative fiction, horror, and fantasy, with a focus on intricate world-building.

  3. Flash fiction: Extremely short stories, often less than 1,000 words, that convey a complete narrative or evoke a specific emotion.

  4. Cli-fi (climate fiction): A subgenre of speculative fiction that deals with climate change and its impact on society and the environment.

  5. Cyberpunk: A subgenre of science fiction that focuses on a dystopian future with advanced technology, artificial intelligence, and societal upheaval.

  6. LitRPG (Literary Role-Playing Games): A genre that combines elements of traditional literature with video game mechanics, such as leveling up, quests, and character stats.

  7. Slipstream: A genre that blends elements of science fiction, fantasy, and literary fiction, often with a focus on the surreal and the fantastical.

  8. Weird Western: A subgenre that combines elements of traditional Westerns with supernatural or speculative fiction themes.

  9. Cozy mysteries: A subgenre of mystery fiction that focuses on small-town settings, amateur sleuths, and a lack of graphic violence or explicit content.

  10. Steampunk: A subgenre of science fiction and fantasy that incorporates technology and aesthetics inspired by 19th-century industrial steam-powered machinery, often set in an alternate history or Victorian-era world.

  11. Gaslamp fantasy: A genre that combines historical fiction with fantasy elements, typically set in the Victorian or Edwardian eras, and often featuring magic or supernatural elements.

  12. Dark academia: A genre that revolves around academic settings, intellectualism, and Gothic themes, often featuring mystery, intrigue, and elements of the macabre.

  13. Afrofuturism: A cultural and literary movement that combines African culture, history, and myth with futuristic technology and science fiction elements.

  14. Fairytale retellings: A genre that takes well-known fairytales and reimagines them with new twists, perspectives, or settings.

  15. Epistolary fiction: A genre in which the narrative is conveyed through a series of documents, such as letters, diary entries, or newspaper clippings.

  16. Solarpunk: A subgenre of speculative fiction that envisions a sustainable, eco-friendly future with a focus on renewable energy, green technology, and utopian societies.

  17. Mythic fiction: A genre that blends elements of mythology, folklore, and legend with contemporary settings and themes.

  18. Wuxia: A genre of Chinese fiction that focuses on martial arts heroes and adventures, often set in ancient China and featuring elements of chivalry, honor, and supernatural abilities.

  19. Magical realism: A literary genre that blends elements of the fantastic or supernatural with realistic settings and characters, often exploring the boundaries between reality and imagination.

  20. Space opera: A subgenre of science fiction that focuses on epic, galaxy-spanning adventures, often featuring interstellar empires, space battles, and larger-than-life characters.

  21. Alternate history: A genre that imagines how history might have unfolded differently, often featuring significant historical events or figures that took different paths.

  22. Biopunk: A subgenre of science fiction that explores the implications of biotechnology, genetic engineering, and biohacking on society and individuals.

  23. Paranormal romance: A genre that combines elements of romance with supernatural or fantastical elements, often featuring vampires, werewolves, or other mythical creatures.

  24. Dieselpunk: A subgenre of speculative fiction that incorporates technology and aesthetics inspired by the diesel-based technology of the early to mid-20th century, often set in an alternate history or dystopian world.

  25. Lovecraftian horror: A subgenre of horror fiction inspired by the works of H.P. Lovecraft, often featuring cosmic horror, ancient gods, and unknowable, eldritch entities.

  26. Time travel romance: A subgenre of romance that involves characters traveling through time, often exploring historical settings and developing relationships across different eras.

  27. Gothic romance: A genre that combines elements of Gothic fiction with romance, often featuring mysterious settings, supernatural occurrences, and passionate relationships.

  28. Hardboiled detective fiction: A subgenre of detective fiction characterized by gritty realism, morally ambiguous protagonists, and dark urban settings.

  29. Urban fantasy: A subgenre of fantasy that features magical elements in modern urban settings, often incorporating elements of mystery, romance, or action.

  30. Sword and sorcery: A subgenre of fantasy that focuses on swashbuckling heroes, magical adventures, and fast-paced action.

  31. Military science fiction: A subgenre of science fiction that explores the impact of advanced technology on warfare and military strategies.

  32. Dystopian romance: A subgenre that combines elements of romance with dystopian settings, often exploring themes of love, hope, and resilience in oppressive societies.

  33. Nordic noir: A subgenre of crime fiction originating from Scandinavian countries, characterized by bleak landscapes, complex characters, and dark, psychological themes.

  34. Mashup fiction: A genre that combines elements of multiple literary genres or incorporates well-known characters and stories in new and inventive ways.

  35. Historical fantasy: A subgenre of fantasy that blends historical settings and events with magical or supernatural elements.

  36. Post-apocalyptic fiction: A genre that explores life and society after a catastrophic event has destroyed or significantly altered the world as we know it.

  37. Humorous fantasy: A subgenre of fantasy that incorporates humor and satire, often parodying or poking fun at common fantasy tropes and conventions.

  38. Regency romance: A subgenre of historical romance set during the British Regency period (1811-1820), often featuring themes of social class, courtship, and manners.

  39. Psychological thriller: A subgenre of thriller fiction that focuses on the psychological and emotional states of the characters, often exploring themes of deception, manipulation, and obsession.

  40. Mind-bending fiction: A genre that challenges the reader's perception of reality, often involving unreliable narrators, non-linear narratives, or philosophical themes.

  41. Folk horror: A subgenre of horror fiction that incorporates elements of folklore, superstition, and rural settings, often exploring themes of isolation, community, and the unknown.

  42. Native American literature: A genre that includes fiction, poetry, and non-fiction works by Native American authors, often exploring themes of identity, culture, and the impact of colonialism.

  43. Paranormal cozy mystery: A subgenre of cozy mystery that incorporates supernatural or fantastical elements, often featuring amateur sleuths with psychic or supernatural abilities.

  44. Fairytale noir: A genre that combines elements of fairytales with the dark, gritty atmosphere of noir fiction, often featuring morally ambiguous characters and twisted storylines.

  45. Nautical fiction: A genre that focuses on stories set at sea, often involving naval battles, piracy, or maritime adventures.

  46. New adult fiction: A genre that explores themes relevant to young adults transitioning to adulthood, often focusing on college life, early career challenges, and romantic relationships.

  47. Kitchen sink realism: A literary movement that focuses on the everyday lives of working-class characters, often exploring themes of social realism, family dynamics, and personal struggles.

  48. Political thriller: A subgenre of thriller fiction that revolves around political intrigue, espionage, and the struggle for power, often set in the world of government, diplomacy, or intelligence agencies.

  49. Legal thriller: A subgenre of thriller fiction that focuses on the legal profession, often featuring lawyers, judges, and courtroom drama.

  50. Superhero fiction: A genre that revolves around characters with superhuman abilities, often exploring themes of heroism, justice, and the struggle between good and evil.

  51. Utopian fiction: A genre that imagines ideal societies or worlds, often exploring themes of political and social organization, technology, and human potential.

  52. Pulp fiction: A genre characterized by sensational, action-packed stories often published in inexpensive, mass-market paperbacks during the first half of the 20th century.

  53. Prepper fiction: A subgenre of post-apocalyptic fiction that focuses on characters who have prepared for a variety of disasters and societal breakdowns, often exploring themes of survival, resourcefulness, and community.

  54. Mannerpunk: A subgenre of fantasy that emphasizes the importance of social manners, etiquette, and political intrigue, often set in a world inspired by historical eras with strict social hierarchies.

  55. Philosophical fiction: A genre that explores philosophical ideas and concepts through storytelling, often featuring characters grappling with existential questions and moral dilemmas.

  56. Flarf poetry: A form of experimental poetry that often incorporates humor, satire, and intentionally absurd or nonsensical elements, sometimes using found text from the internet as source material.

  57. Golden Age detective fiction: A subgenre of detective fiction that flourished during the 1920s and 1930s, often featuring amateur sleuths, "locked room" mysteries, and intricate puzzle-like plots.

  58. Space western: A subgenre that combines elements of science fiction and western genres, often featuring frontier settings, space travel, and interplanetary colonization.

  59. Eco-fiction: A genre that explores the relationship between humans and the natural environment, often featuring themes of conservation, climate change, and ecological disaster.

  60. Sports fiction: A genre that focuses on the world of sports, often exploring themes of competition, personal growth, and the pursuit of excellence.

  61. Mythpunk: A subgenre that blends mythology, folklore, and punk aesthetics, often subverting traditional narratives and featuring anti-authoritarian themes.

  62. Paranormal women's fiction: A subgenre that combines elements of women's fiction with supernatural or fantastical elements, often focusing on female protagonists facing life changes or personal growth.

  63. Hard science fiction: A subgenre of science fiction that emphasizes scientific accuracy and technical detail, often exploring the impact of scientific breakthroughs on society and individuals.

  64. Harem literature: A genre that revolves around a protagonist, usually male, surrounded by multiple romantic interests or admirers.

  65. Time slip fiction: A genre that features characters or events that move between different time periods, often exploring themes of history, memory, and the passage of time.

  66. Animal fiction: A genre that features stories told from the perspective of animals or with animal protagonists, often exploring themes of nature, survival, and the human-animal relationship.

  67. Soft science fiction: A subgenre of science fiction that focuses more on character development, social issues, and speculative ideas rather than hard scientific principles.

  68. Campus novel: A genre that revolves around academic settings, often exploring themes of intellectualism, social dynamics, and coming-of-age.

  69. Inspirational fiction: A genre that focuses on uplifting stories of personal growth, spiritual development, and the triumph of the human spirit.

  70. Techno-thriller: A subgenre of thriller fiction that explores the intersection of technology, science, and politics, often featuring cutting-edge tech, espionage, and high-stakes scenarios.

  71. Paranormal investigator fiction: A subgenre that features protagonists who investigate supernatural occurrences, often blending elements of mystery, horror, and fantasy.

  72. Noir fiction: A subgenre of crime fiction characterized by a dark, gritty atmosphere, morally ambiguous characters, and an overall sense of pessimism and fatalism.

  73. Rural noir: A subgenre of crime fiction set in rural settings, often featuring small-town secrets, dysfunctional family dynamics, and a sense of isolation.

  74. Magical girl fiction: A genre that revolves around female protagonists with magical powers, often exploring themes of friendship, teamwork, and personal growth.

  75. Medical thriller: A subgenre of thriller fiction that focuses on medical professionals, research, and ethics, often featuring medical conspiracies, pandemics, or cutting-edge science.

  76. Body horror: A subgenre of horror fiction that explores themes of physical transformation, mutation, and the breakdown of the human body.

  77. Hopepunk: A subgenre of speculative fiction that emphasizes hope, resilience, and the power of human kindness in the face of adversity.

  78. Weird fiction: A genre that blends elements of horror, science fiction, and fantasy, often featuring bizarre, unexplainable phenomena or supernatural occurrences.

  79. Experimental fiction: A genre that challenges traditional storytelling conventions, often incorporating unconventional narrative structures, language, or themes.

  80. Chivalric romance: A genre of medieval literature that features tales of knights, courtly love, and chivalric values, often involving quests, battles, and magical elements.

  81. Procedural drama: A genre that focuses on the detailed, step-by-step process of solving crimes, legal cases, or other complex problems, often highlighting the expertise and dedication of the protagonists.

  82. Erotic thriller: A subgenre of thriller fiction that incorporates elements of erotica, often featuring explicit sexual content alongside suspenseful, dangerous situations.

  83. Spy fiction: A genre that revolves around espionage, secret agents, and undercover operations, often exploring themes of loyalty, betrayal, and the moral complexities of the spy world.

  84. Heist fiction: A genre that focuses on the planning and execution of elaborate thefts, cons, or robberies, often featuring ensemble casts and intricate plot twists.

  85. Gothic science fiction: A subgenre that combines elements of Gothic fiction with science fiction, often featuring dark, dystopian worlds, advanced technology, and elements of horror or the supernatural.

  86. Contemporary Western: A genre that focuses on stories set in the modern American West, often exploring themes of community, family, and the struggle between tradition and progress.

  87. Social science fiction: A subgenre of science fiction that explores the impact of social and cultural changes on society and individuals, often addressing issues such as race, gender, and class.

  88. Haiku: A traditional form of Japanese poetry that consists of three lines with a 5-7-5 syllable pattern, often focusing on the natural world and the passage of time.

  89. Cybernoir: A subgenre that combines elements of cyberpunk and noir fiction, often featuring dystopian, technologically advanced settings, morally ambiguous characters, and complex, shadowy plots.

  90. Absurdist fiction: A genre that explores the irrational and chaotic nature of human existence, often incorporating surreal, nonsensical, or contradictory elements.

  91. Generation ship fiction: A subgenre of science fiction that focuses on stories set aboard generation ships—spaceships designed to carry generations of inhabitants on long journeys through space.

  92. Victorian science fiction: A subgenre that combines elements of science fiction with Victorian-era settings and sensibilities, often exploring themes of industrialization, social change, and scientific progress.

  93. Xenofiction: A genre that features non-human protagonists or perspectives, often exploring themes of alienation, cultural differences, and the challenges of understanding and communicating with other species.

  94. Tragicomedy: A genre that blends elements of tragedy and comedy, often featuring dark humor, complex characters, and emotionally charged situations.

  95. Interactive fiction: A genre that invites reader participation in the storytelling process, often through choices that influence the direction of the narrative or the outcome of the story.

  96. Culinary fiction: A genre that focuses on stories centered around food, cooking, and culinary culture, often incorporating elements of romance, mystery, or personal growth.

  97. Mundane science fiction: A subgenre of science fiction that focuses on stories set within our own solar system, often eschewing faster-than-light travel and other advanced technology.

  98. Gothic fairytales: A genre that combines elements of Gothic fiction with traditional fairytales, often featuring darker themes, supernatural elements, and twisted versions of familiar stories.

  99. Neo-Victorian fiction: A genre that reimagines or reinterprets Victorian literature, culture, and history, often featuring contemporary themes, alternative perspectives, or updated settings.

  100. Historical mystery: A subgenre of mystery fiction that takes place in a historical setting, often featuring real or fictional historical figures as protagonists or supporting characters.

  101. Suburban Gothic: A genre that combines elements of Gothic fiction with suburban settings, often exploring themes of domestic unease, hidden secrets, and the dark side of suburban life.

  102. Retro-futurism: A genre that explores imagined futures from the perspective of past eras, often featuring outdated or fantastical technologies, design aesthetics, and societal structures.

  103. Solarpunk: A subgenre of speculative fiction that envisions optimistic, sustainable futures powered by renewable energy, often focusing on themes of environmentalism, community, and social justice.

  104. Epistolary fiction: A genre that tells stories through letters, diary entries, or other forms of written communication, often emphasizing the emotional and psychological states of the characters.

  105. Picaresque novel: A genre that follows the adventures of a roguish, low-born protagonist as they navigate through a corrupt society, often satirizing social norms and institutions.

  106. Business fiction: A genre that explores the world of business, finance, and corporate culture, often featuring themes of ambition, power, and ethical dilemmas.











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